Yellowstone Park: a Paradise for Trout Fishing

When we talk about Yellowstone Park the first thing that comes to mind is definitely the bear Yoghi and its legendary snack baskets, but what you probably don’t know is that Yellowstone Park, in addition to being a concentration of postcard landscapes, is also a real paradise for trout fishing. And I don’t think I’m exaggerating when I tell you that it’s one of the best places I’ve ever caught trout in my entire career as a fisherman.

We’ve already talked about my last trip to America and its organization, and I’ve already told you about my experience hunting black bass in California, which honestly left me with a bit of bitterness in my mouth. After that experience, my girlfriend and I left Los Angeles behind and set off on the road to Las Vegas, not just to go and spend some money in the dozens of casinos, but more to make a detour to the Bass Pro Shop in Las Vegas. A real mecca and forced stop for lovers of spinning fishing that I highly recommend you to visit! Not only to go shopping (even if I doubt you will be able to do without it) but also just to see how Americans live their passion for fishing and for the outdoors in general.

After Las Vegas I put the fishing aside for a while and we went to the Grand Canyon and immediately afterwards to Salt Lake City, a must on the long way to Yellowstone. Then finally, after another stop in the Grand Teton National Park, this one too very attractive for trout fishing even if I had no chance to test it with a fishing rod in my hand, and after a night spent in a lodge in the mountains and woods, we arrived at the long-awaited Yellowstone Park.

The Yellowstone Park

When they tell you about Yellowstone Park what you have to think about is very different from any national park you are used to here in Italy. When I told you that Yellowstone was a concentration of postcard landscapes I wasn’t exaggerating.

Imagine an expanse of woods, mountains, rivers and lakes all excellently preserved and cared for by the park’s authorities who also take care of safeguarding wildlife. Bears, moose, buffalo, deer (and of course also trout), if you happen to visit this little corner of paradise will not be difficult to see all these animals walking through the park. A thing that makes you think if you think of the dusty media when talking about wild animals like bears, or as more recently with wild boars.

Of course there will be geysers, and other wonders of nature that can not fail to leave you speechless. And by the way, if you happen to find a point where a geyser discharges its water in the stream, I suggest you to resist a little ‘the strong smell of sulfur and try to make a couple of jumps in that stream. You might have some really nice surprises.

My Day Dedicated To Trout Fishing In The Yellowstone Park

The third day in the park would have been dedicated to trout fishing. So, after having seen some zones of the park that we had not yet succeeded in visiting there are direct toward the Fishing Bridge on the Yellowstone river. The name of the bridge, and some unclear online guides, had let me understand that that would be a great place to try to fish. Too bad that as soon as we arrived at the bridge a sign warned us that it was strictly forbidden to fish in that area.

Walking on the bridge I also understood why: under the Fishing Bridge (which I discovered to be called so because until the ’70s it was really the favorite destination of local fishermen, a bit ‘like some fishing lakes here with us), there will have been a dozen trout no smaller than 70 cm. A spectacle that gassed me to the extreme, so I decided to go up the Yellowstone river and look for a point to finally launch my rotors.

As soon as I found an open space where to park my car I went down on the river and I started to throw. I didn’t go down there too thinly, I mounted a 30 euro telescopic rod with a rotating single-leaf jack and I started to beat the river. It took only about ten launches to find a nice trout in the barrel.

I immediately understood that it was a fairly large trout, not a small brownie (which for us Italians would be small beetles). Carried to the shore in fact I saw a beautiful cutthroat trout, the red throat trout that I had already met here in Italy on the Mastallone. Unfortunately, just like that time on the Mastallone, the trout managed to free itself under the feet leaving me with a dry mouth.

After this disappointment I decided to leave the Yellowstone river and move on a smaller stream, so returning to our accommodation I stopped on the Gibbon River, attracted by this huge expanse of flat land with the river that lapped it like a painting. And here I saw the real potential of Yellowstone Park: I’m not kidding if I say that every two or three throws I had a brownie in the reed, not huge trout, but all very funny.

I tried again the same sensations I felt a year ago in Lapland, that is to fish on a really healthy stream and with a really wild trout population. A fantastic feeling that I have rarely experienced in my life. I caught with buffaloes looking at me on the other side of the river, and I really felt like an intruder in their world. Something I will remember for the rest of my life as a fisherman.

After the Gibbon River I moved to the Madison River to try to increase the size of the trout, here the catches were not so frequent, even if the small brownies had not abandoned me yet.

Shortly before closing everything I felt a tremendous blow, instinctively I ferried and found myself in the reed another great beautiful trout that was immediately thrown into the current. With that very bad spring reed I immediately had the impression that I would not be able to force it out, and in fact it was. I could only see the wonderful silhouette of that trout go up, roll on the surface of the water and free itself. 

So from the distance I would say that it could be an rainbow or a cutthroat about 50 or 60 cm and I eat my hands for losing that beautiful trout that could be the perfect crowning of my fishing trip in Yellowstone Park … it will be for next time, because there will certainly be a next time in this corner of paradise!

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